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bhanta, baigun, eggplant

Bhanta, Baigun, or Eggplant

Binomial family Solanum Melongena

In Nepal, eggplants are basically cooked as quick stew, stir fry or deep fried. 

More about eggplant as reference- 

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?dbid=22&tname=foodspice

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kalo bhatmas, black soybeans

Kalo bhatmas, black soybeans

Binomial name Glycine max

Some famous dishes of Nepal made from black soybeans are samay baji, bhatmas sadheko, gundruk ra bhatmas etc.

More external links –

https://www.verywell.com/where-to-get-black-soy-beans-2242293

http://www.doctoroz.com/slideshow/black-soybean

http://medusanews.com/articles/black-soybeans-benefits-and-harms-doctor-review/

 

Ritthako tarul, yellow yam

Ritthako tarul, yellow yam 

Major consumption of all types of yams are on one particular festival, Maghe Sangkrati, which lies at the end of winter. That day people celebrate believing that the winter may be over.

Yams are simply boiled, roasted, or cooked as a stew with vegetables. 

Hattipailey tarul, purple yam

Hattipailey tarul, purple yam

Binomial name Dioscorea alata 

Major consumption of all types of yams are on one particular festival, Maghe Sangkrati, which lies at the end of winter. That day people celebrate believing that the winter may be over.

Yams are simply boiled, roasted, or cooked as a stew with vegetables. 

Ghar tarul, local cassava

Ghar tarul, local cassava

Family of  Manihot esculenta

There are different types of taruls grown in Nepal. Above is a locally grown tarul. 

Major consumption of all types of cassavas are on one particular festival, Maghe Sangkrati, which lies at the end of winter. That day people celebrate believing that the winter may be over.

Cassavas are simply boiled, roasted, or cooked as a stew with vegetables

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Ukhu, sugarcane

Ukkhu, sugarcane, one of the several perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum

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Suntala, tangerine

Suntala, tangerine, botanical name Citrus tangerina

– Oranges and tangerines are basically generalized or called as suntala in Nepal. But those two fruits are different nature. Tangerines are smaller than oranges. They are less sour and tart than oranges. Their trees grows upto 20 feet tall unlike oranges which grow about 30 feet tall.

– A famous snack dish Suntala sandeko is prepared by marinating tangerines with salt and chili. This is eaten in the sunny winter days while staying outdoors.

references –
http://www.differencebetween.net/object/difference-between-orange-and-tangerine/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUhZ-IY3I3Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3C6zr8C7zjM

http://www.agricultureinnepal.com/orange-farm

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Kauli, cauliflower

Kauli, phoolkopi, cauliflower

Binomial family Brassica Oleracea

Kauli, pholkopi or cauliflower is an important vegetable in Nepali kitchen. the white part or the florets are used for cooking and the stems and leaves are often used for soups or feed livestock. Potatoes are often mixed with cauli to make it taste even better. Cauli is served often in Nepali bhoj bhatter [party].

Some of the famous cauliflower dishes are aloo cauliko tarkari [cauliflower and potato curry], cauliko achar [pickled cauliflower], cauli matar tarkari [cauliflower and green peas curry, cauliko chop [batter fried cauliflower], cauliko pakoda [cauliflower fritters], cauliflower usineko cauli [steamed cauliflower], cauliko sukuti [dehydrated cauliflower]  etc.

Phoolkopi [cauli] is one of the major vegetable crops of Nepal. Terai [flatlands] sell more cauli than pahad [hilly region]. Most of the farmers have been growing hybrid cauliflowers lately. Its is a fall season crop which is grows during Nepali festival season [dashain and tihar].

The health benefits of cauliflower include a reduced risk of cancerheart and brain disorders, relief from indigestion, detoxification of the body, increased iron absorption, and weight loss.

References  –

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305403905_Production_and_Marketing_Potentiality_of_Cauliflower_Brassica_oleracea_var_botrytis_from_the_Perspective_of_Commercialization_in_Taplejung_District_of_Nepal

http://www.asiafarming.com/cauliflower-cultivation/

http://saknepal.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Hopkins-Scott.pdf

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/vegetable/health-benefits-of-cauliflower.html

https://www.foodpleasureandhealth.com/blog/2016/10/nepali-style-cauli-aloo.html

https://www.buzzfeed.com/christinebyrne/bhuteko-cauli?utm_term=.xupV5QBqm#.jeXpDPXnL

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Tatey simi, sword beans

Tate simi, hiude simi, sword beans.

They are also recognized by dolichos bean, hyacinth bean, seim bean (India), Egyptian bean, bonavist bean/pea, dolico lablab, fagiolo indiano, etc.

Binomial name Lablab purpureus.  

Alternate Scientific Names – Dolichos benghalensis Jacq., Dolichos lablab L., Dolichos purpureus L., Lablab niger Medikus, Lablab purpurea (L.) Sweet, Lablab vulgaris (L.) Savi, Vigna aristata Piper.

One the seasonal beans of Nepal which is planted on spring season like mid April [baisakh first week]. They start to see flower anytime after mid-summer. The pods will form shortly after the flowers start fading and pods also starts to change its color according to different bean types. Mature beans are dried and can be stored for next season crop. 

This crop is grown in Terai [Nepali flat land area] to the High Hills in frost free season. The green pods of various size and shapes are consumed as vegetables.

These beans are freshly picked and cooked. To clean the pod, simply pull off the top and “unzip” the seam of the bean pod. Open the pod and remove the beans. Fresh pods and beans are often cooked together with potatoes, which is a famous combination of dish named Alu Simi. Alu means potatoes and simi means beans. 

References –

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320532256_Food_Legumes_Diversity_Utilization_and_Conservation_Status

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qP2IniDF_-0

Amba, guava

Amba [Nepali name], guava [English name].

Binomial name Psidium guajava.

Guava is a yellowish tropical fruit, globular or pear shaped with thin, yellow, green or brown skin. It tastes like a combination of strawberry and a pear. The pulp found inside the fruit may taste sweet or sour depending on the type of guava or the ripeness of the fruit.

Guava farming in Nepal started ancient times growing their own use only. Guava is one of the most common fruits successfully grown all over Nepal in both tropical and subtropical climates. It is grown in the Terai [flat lands] and pahad [hilly region]. It is grown from an altitude of 115 meters above sea level in Bara to 1600 meters above sea level in Terhathum. Guava is a favorite fruit among poor farmers as it is a relatively low maintenance crop that reaps great benefits.  

Guava is rich in Vitamin C and it helps to protect cells and lower cancerous damage to them. 

References – 

https://everythingagriculture.wordpress.com/2015/11/26/nepalese-guava/

http://www.agricultureinnepal.com/guava-farm

https://www.nepjol.info/index.php/JIAAS/article/download/665/630

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-guava.html

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/guava/common-guava-tree-varieties.htm